PBC takes a look at the NME LE

PBC takes a look at the NME LE

PBC takes a look at the new System X NME LE
review by Young Choi

www.systemx.com

Man after many months of begging, System X finally relented (or got sick and tired of my vast many phone calls and emails) to let us review one of their hot new NMEs. Man did I ever beg, I heard these guns ripped and shot very accurately. I heard all the hype, read the message boards and I realized, “Man I gotta get my hands on one!”

The new NME LE
The new NME LE
Low and behold UPS dropped off a package from System X. With anticipation I opened the package up and was say stoked… Not only did they (System X) send me an NME, but they sent me the hot new NME LE that is milled down and waifier compared to its older sister. As I opened up the box, I was truly amazed with the milling. Literally, a lot of aluminumized meat was just gone! I lifted the marker out of the box and was amazed by how light the gun was. The gun felt sturdy but due to the weight (or lack of) the NME LE almost felt like a toy in my hands. The weight of the NME LE you may be wondering? A measly 2.9 lbs. on our scale! Crazy.

Spacious trigger space
Spacious trigger space
I pawed over this new toy and realized all the goodies that come on this marker. The very squishy System X 45 grips made holding the NME LE absolutely comfortable and my grip (even without gloves) with the marker was very firm. The magnetic roller bearing trigger is slightly humped in the middle and was very easy to adjust. In fact I got the trigger adjustment so short that just tapping the side of the trigger made this gun break the high teens to early twenty balls-per-second number. And the trigger guard, it is huge; I was actually able to walk three fingers constantly without ever bumping my fingers in the front of the trigger guard.

The NME comes with an adjustable ram cap as standard. This is a relief seeing as how the other marker that looks like the NME (Timmies) don’t come with one as standard yet costs more…

Break-beam anti-chop eyes worked very well and in all the testing, I never once chopped a ball in the breach even at the super crazy “NME wants to run away cuz the trigger was set so short.” This gun is fast, and if you set it up for it, this gun will shoot as fast as your loader can feed it paint.

The NME LE comes with a gripping feed neck to keep any loader on it with a gorilla grip. And the on/off ASA has a large knob to deliver air from the tank to the gun. The large knob for the on/off was very easy to turn and worked very well, bonus on the NME LE is that you can mount any dove-tailed ASA on the NME LE thanks to the rail.

Consistent flow thru the LPR
Consistent flow thru the LPR
The System X Inline Regulator provided consistent air to the valve of the NME LE. During testing, I never once got the gun to shoot down even at the highest rates of fire. On the front is the low pressure regulator which supplies consistent air flow to the solenoid ensuring that the ram gets the most consistent amount of air pressure so that the balls land right on top of each other. The external hose was a concern for me initially, but thinking back to my Autococker days I never once had a hose blow out on my pneumatics and I for sure didn’t have any problems with the NME LE with the multiple gun hits it took during testing (the rough dives and slides also didn’t affect it either). Just as I stopped worrying about my Cocker hoses, I also stopped worrying about the LPR hose. From the factory the LPR was set at 60 PSI and that’s pretty much where I left it. The bolt was very gentle and I was able to stick my finger down the breach and feel how soft the bolt was while pulling the trigger. I’m sure the combination of the low pressure and the eyes are the reason that I didn’t chop any paintballs during testing.

The NME LE came with a two piece System X barrel. This barrel proved to be decently accurate as I was getting a decent pie pan sized grouping at 150 feet. I’ll explain why it was just decent later in this review.

WAS board under the hood
WAS board under the hood
The circuit board is the world renowned Wicked Air Sportz Board- WAS. WAS has been one of the early pioneers of marker circuit boards and the WAS programming delivers. With the NME LE WAS board, one can adjust just about any setting… debounce, dwell, rate of fire, modes (NPPL single shot, PSP 15 bps ramping, and NXL 15 bps full auto… or just flat out dangerous crazy with a 1 debounce and super short trigger pull to make it abouts mid 20 to low 30 pbs full auto ~ I don’t recommend this though cuz it makes the gun almost uncontrollable), eye delay, and loader delay.

On/off button with LED indicator
On/off button with LED indicator
To get into programming mode is quite simple to program the WAS board for NPPL, PSP and NXL mode (semi, ramp and full auto ramp) is a snap. Once in programming mode pull the trigger until you see the alternating green orange flashing light. This is the firing mode programming section. Hold the trigger till the lights go out and count the alternating flashes. This will determine what the WAS board was set at. To change it simply pull the trigger the number of times that represent the setting you want. 1 for semi (NPPL), 2 for ramp (PSP) and 3 for full auto ramp (NXL). If you do this in the allowed time you will see a rainbow flash confirming the settings have been changed. If you see a red green flash you took too long and the settings were NOT changed. Repeat the steps. To get out of programming mode simply turn the marker off.

Aside from the software and the trigger on the NME LE, the ram stroke on the gun also aides in rate of fire. The NME was designed around the Intimidator concept. The stroke was reduced from the normal 1.045" (Intimidator) to just .82". This means at the exact same rate of fire, the bolt moves 21.53% less distance EACH WAY! Why is this important? Because this means that there is more time for a ball to fall into the breech, resulting in a substantially faster rate of fire when using a gravity-feed type of hopper. This means that an Intimidator shooting 10bps for 10 seconds will have the bolt move a distance of 209 inches (17.41 feet). The NME's bolt shooting at the same 10bps for 10 seconds would travel 164 inches (13.66 feet). That is 3.74 fewer feet of travel! Crazy huh?

I’m sure you are all interested in how the NME LE performed on the field… well let me tell you. Upon taking it to the field, I gassed it up with a 68 4500 tank and fitted an Empire Reloader B loader and took it upon myself to check this new strap out. For testing I used Proto Paintballs. At the chrono I shot an initial string of 272, 278, 276, 280, and 269 fps. For a gun out of the box, I found this to be acceptable but after 10 cases of paint I would expect the chrono groupings to get tighter. Seeing as the field limit was 285 fps, I just left the velocity alone. Had I adjusted the velocity, I would have adjusted it via the inline regulator.

Now it was time to rip a string. I already messed with the trigger at the office and had it adjusted to my liking… soft/short. I had the NME LE on PSP mode and ripped away. Man, 15 bps sure doesn’t seem that fast… I don’t know what all the complaining is about from the anti-PSP ramping crowd. I went to adjust the gun to pure semi with a debounce of two and the NME LE was a pure joy. I was probably doing about 16 to 18 bps with the gun. I next brought the debounce down to one and the rate of fire probably got near 20 bps. At least it sounded the same pace as the guys with ramping 20+ bps. I decided that debounce two would be fair. Next I checked the accuracy of the stock barrel. As I stated before, the groupings were decent… but once I slapped my Dye UL barrel, the NME LE was wickedly accurate with strings just falling ball on ball of each other. That’s more like it.

I headed off to the air ball field and I have got to say, with the ergonomics of the trigger frame and the inline regulator, shouldering the NME LE was very comfortable and naturally placed the gun in my look down the length of the gun stance with my nose right behind the body of the gun. There was no kick to this gun nor a loud shot signature. In fact the movement of the bolt was louder than a paintball coming out of the barrel. Crazy…

Well after two cases of paint and many welts later, the NME LE definitely held up to the rigors of tournament style paintball. The accuracy was insane as I was picking off shoes, hoppers, and elbows all day once I switched out the barrel and do I even need to bring up, again, how much paint this strap can put out? I wasn't the only one impressed with it either, the NME LE was definitely a head turner at the field with many players wanting to try it out. Dave, our Manager, has taken a liking to the gun and I haven't seen it since except when he is playing.

I think System X has a winner here and even though the NME LE is fully loaded, the price is also very good for a marker of this caliber. The going rate for the NME LE on most online sites is $950, not bad when you consider all that the NME comes with when comparing it to a Timmy.

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